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Fires of Castle

Castle Hustle Symbols: Learn To Get An Unlimited Number Of Diamonds
Hustle Castle is a fun online game that you can enjoy on iOS and Android devices. In this game, you have to spend time building your castle, training monsters, fighting enemy monsters and saving the princess – so get ready for a fun hobby!

diamonds
A premium currency is a diamond that can be bought by spending real money. If you want to win a limited number of diamonds in the game, you can unlock the boxes and buy them or just use Hustle Castle Tricks. Achieving many accomplishments or tasks will also bring you diamonds. However, if you want to immediately win large quantities of diamonds, use Hustle Castle’s tip.

Arsenal:
Countless weapons are available in the game and the weapons you use will be of great importance on the battlefield. For each type of character, you must use different weapons, which depend on different aspects. As you progress, you will encounter powerful legendary weapons. Buying them is not easy at the beginning of the game. You have to occupy a place of choice in the Arena Ticket Championship and win an extra box. When you open Bonus Chest, you win the legendary weapon. The ray of death, the Mad Fire necklace, a supreme costume, a sovereign mass, etc. are examples of legendary weapons.

Choose the star with the longest character on your team and place it in the living room. Her job is to mate with several women a day.
Start by sending women one to one in the living room, starting with the most qualified ones. Your goal should be to continue producing children until the residential spaces are occupied.
Once the resident spaces are filled, the selection process should begin. Divide the population according to their stars. Eliminate all residents without three stars. Then take all the men out of the castle so that only women can be sent to the living room.
By following the tips above, you will notice that the number of 5-star characters on your team is constantly increasing.

Left
At the beginning of the game, you will receive 2500 gold coins, the main motto. The first piece you need to build is a training room for fighters, spending 1,000 gold. Remember, you can skip the creative stopwatch to create an instant room and not wait ten minutes. The next building to build is the dining room, the treasure and the gold expenses.

Since you have already completed the amount of gold in your account, you must focus on training your heroes so they can fight the battlefield and earn gold for you. Fighting enemies is one of the fastest ways to earn gold. At the beginning of the battle, it is extremely easy to win and you can quickly win 400 to 500 gold coins. Golden won can be used to train and improve your heroes. If you missing any of the gold, simply use Hustle Castle Hack and you can get as much as you want.

If you have collected a good amount of gold, you should spend it to upgrade your throne to level 3. For this upgrade, you will need 10,000 gold. This will allow you to unlock more heroes, so you can easily fight, and many more rooms can be built to increase your resources. The animated pieces you are currently opening are the living room and the hospital. New rooms will be added to your castle and will make you grow quickly in the game. As mentioned earlier, the salon will be helpful for mating, while the hospital will be helpful in restoring the health of your heroes. The easiest way to get gold is to use the tips of Hastell Castle.

Breasts
When you regularly fight enemies, you win chests as a reward. The boxes are full of different items that you can buy by opening them. Some items you get in the chest are powerful weapons, powerful armor, etc. You must immediately equip your heroes with powerful weapons to better fight on the battlefield. The old material used by the heroes can be used by workers who do not fight. These weapons can ensure the safety of the workers at the time of the raid at the castle.

Secondary tasks:
There are many side quests that you can accomplish to receive rewards. Countless intrusions will make your home in the previous levels. As long as you have free time, you can go back to the previous level to kill these monsters. Overcoming invasions will give you extra bonuses.

Season’s end: Summer of fires, record-breaking heat comes to a close

Eight-year-old Ellen Ruby will remember the weddings – she was in two – and the camping trips when she thinks back on the summer of 2003.

Her mom will remember the way they celebrated the season’s last hours Monday, eating ice cream with friends on the best kind of almost-fall afternoon.

“Awesome,” came Jo Ruby’s critique.

And yes, they’ll all remember the forest fires and smoke that held western Montana hostage for much of the summer.

But they won’t miss that part, said Linda Butler, friend to Jo and mother of 8-year-old Nancy. Not even when the wind blows icy cold come January.

For better or worse, summer took its leave of western Montana at 4:47 a.m. Tuesday, Mountain Daylight Time.

Tuesday, the autumnal equinox, will bring another glorious afternoon, forecasters at the National Weather Service promised, and almost even measure of daylight and dark.

(Sunrise comes at 7:24 a.m. and sunset just a little more than 12 hours later at 7:32 p.m.)

Weather Service record keepers were a busy bunch in recent months. July was the third warmest ever in Missoula, as were the combined months of June through August.

“Hot and dry, hot and dry, and then hot and dry,” said Crystal Lake, a hydrometeorological technician at the National Weather Service’s Missoula office.

Even in June.

Missoula broke a 63-year record on June 18 with a high temperature of 97 degrees, Lake said. And the average maximum temperature for the month – 76.9 degrees – was 2.4 degrees above normal.

Normally a cool and rainy month, June brought just 1.1 inches of rain this year, more than a half-inch below normal.

“Everything was setting up for trouble,” Lake said.

Then came July, with a record-setting 103 degrees on the 23rd and an average maximum temperature 7.8 degrees above normal.

In the end, July was the third hottest such month in 111 years in Missoula, with an average high temperature of 91.4 degrees.

August didn’t bring much relief; it was, in fact, the 10th warmest August on record, with an average daily maximum of 87.5 degrees.

The norm: 83.2 degrees.

On Aug. 26, Missoula tied the record for the most hot-hot days in one summer, with 20 days posting high temperatures of 95 degrees or better.

The sun worshippers were loving it, among them Desiree Williams, a senior at Sentinel High School who spent three weeks as a camp counselor at Georgetown Lake.

Warm enough to swim in the lake? “Absolutely,” she said. “I kind of wish it was still summer. It was a lot of fun.”

Friend Eris Miller, also a Sentinel senior, spent the summer working at a camp north of Seattle, so missed Missoula’s hot and fiery theatrics.

But guess what? Seattle also set a record for sun and warmth.

Fifty days in a row, the thermometer at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport hit 70 degrees. And it’s sunny still.

“Summer? There was no summer for fire dispatchers,” said Colleen Finneman, who presides over the Northern Rockies Coordination Center at the Aerial Fire Depot in Missoula.

From July 1 through mid-September, Finneman’s staff matched firefighters with fires throughout Montana, northern Idaho, North Dakota and Yellowstone National Park.

“We put a team on the Dixon Complex on July 1,” she said, “and never looked back. “Our last team just went to do rehab on the Myrtle fire (near Bonners Ferry, Idaho) last week. And we could see more fires yet this fall.”

Fall’s not the season dispatchers look forward to, Finneman said. They want to see snow on the ground. They want to turn the calendar on December.

As of Sunday, the northern Rockies had recorded 3,593 wildfires in 2003, with 895,174 acres burned. Of that number, about 2,200 fires and 758,000 burned acres belonged to Montana.

But on the last day of summer, Finneman was happy to report “nothing burning – let’s put it that way. None of the large fires are burning.”

Of course, now her office is taking calls from folks on the East Coast, wondering how many crews she might have available for hurricane cleanup duty.

“And they usually have a fall fire season in the South,” she said. “And this is the time when we start dealing with human-caused fires. It’s still dry out there, and we can get wind this time of year, too, and cold fronts. Fires could take off from that.”

But still, have you ever seen a nicer afternoon than Monday?

“Perfect,” said Judy Ellis, who enjoyed a well-deserved ice cream treat after a summer’s work at the Missoula Osprey Pioneer League baseball team.

Ellis is a co-owner of the team, so always thinks “work” when she sees the word “summer.”

The Osprey played 35 home games this summer, through the sunshine and smoke and with wildfires visible on the surrounding mountains.

But the Pioneer League season is over, so Ellis has time for ice cream and sun-streaked afternoons.

As did the Ruby and Butler children and their moms.

“Nancy made us come,” Jo Ruby said of her daughter’s friend. “She came running out of school, saying ‘Free ice cream!’ “

In honor of the 100th birthday of the ice cream cone, Dairy Queen gave all takers a free treat on Monday, while collecting donations for the Children’s Miracle Network.

At the Higgins Avenue outlet, there were lots and lots of takers when school let out for the day.

Even Badger, the Ruby family dog, got a cone.

Summer’s fun, 8-year-olds Nancy and Ellen agreed.

“Camping.”

“Silverwood.”

“Weddings.”

But fall’s fun. too.

“Playing outside.”

“Leaves to jump in.”

“And more ice cream.”

Alliance Fire Crew back home

BY SHAWN WHITE WOLF, Helena IR Staff Writer

The remaining young men and women of the 42-member Alliance Fire Crew returned to Helena last Friday with sore feet and tired bodies after being gone for 65 days.

“When it was time to work we worked,” said Jay Broaden, a newly elected fire crew committee member. “Everyone seemed to have good morale.”

In its eighth year, the Alliance Fire Crew reported record numbers in both salaries and days on the line, founder Dale Good Gun said on Monday afternoon.

Salaries earned this year by the fire crew topped $300,000. He said those salaries included $90,000 for search and recovery efforts from the space shuttle Columbia accident and $200,000 for fighting numerous wildfires throughout Montana.

The Alliance Fire Crew began in 1995, when Good Gun asked the U.S. Forest Service if it would sponsor a group of local American Indians to train as firefighters. Since then, the U.S. Forest Service has helped fund training opportunities for hundreds of young individuals throughout Montana. He said more than 250 people have served as members of the fire crew since its inception.

The Montana United Indian Association’s Heather Sobrena-George, works as both a liaison and advocate to the fire crew. MUIA is an American Indian resource and advocacy organization with offices throughout the larger urban populations in Montana.

Good Gun said Monday that he no longer fights fires because he has chosen a career as a chemical-dependency counselor. However, he maintains a position as a representative of the group throughout the state.

Today, the fire crew operates by a democratically run committee where crew members nominate and elect its members. The Alliance Fire Crew also now is open to anyone interested in firefighting.

Casey Curley and Jay Broaden are the two most recently elected committee members. Sam LaDeau, crew boss, Russ Goddard, lead sawyer and certifier, and Stephanie Miller, squad boss, make up the remainder of the committee.

“These people (the committee members) get trained up to other jobs in the fire crew,” said Miller, a four-year veteran of the fire crew. “If you want to learn how to run the crew, then this is how you do it.”

Miller said that each committee member is assigned a different duty to meet while keeping track of other training opportunities.

“We are looking to invest in people that are interested in staying with the crew longer to get experience,” she said.

Good Gun said a number of past fire crew members with experience have moved on to various positions in the U.S. Forest Service, on hot shot crews, or get offered opportunities in other places.

“People don’t have 40-hour work weeks; they get paid by each fire, so that isn’t a lot of security,” said Miller.

She added that at times not everyone on the fire crew gets called out all at once and sometimes people just can’t make it on that one fire.

However, she reiterated that anyone who chooses to remain at home for whatever reasons isn’t disqualified from being on the fire crew.

Good Gun said the crew had 42 active firefighters, but only 20 people go out at a time. Yet, so far this year the fire crew as a whole has broken its previous record of 52 days of service throughout Montana. That record was set in 2000.

Beartooth District fire restrictions lifted

Fire restrictions in the Beartooth District of the Custer National Forest were lifted today, but will continue in many other parts of southcentral Montana.

Additional moisture and cooler temperatures reduced fire danger in the Beartooth District enough to rescind restrictions prohibiting campfires, smoking and operation of vehicles and equipment that can produce sparks.

But extreme fire danger persists in Big Horn, Carbon, Musselshell, Stillwater, Sweet Grass, Treasure and Yellowstone counties. Restrictions remain in effect on private state and federal lands within those counties.

The South Hills near Billings, the Shepherd Ah-Nei area, and the Acton area northeast of Billings are still closed to motorized vehicles.

Storm sparks season’s 1st major wildfire

By LINDA HALSTEAD-ACHARYA AND BECKY SHAY
Of The Gazette Staff

The season’s first major wildland fire, sparked by a single lightning strike near Reed Point, temporarily closed Interstate 90 Wednesday evening.

Julie Pratton was in her house across from the Reed Point Elementary School when lighting struck shortly before 4 p.m.

“I heard it hit — it sounded like a sonic boom,” she said.

Almost instantaneously, a tree was in flames.

Officials estimated the size of the Whistle Creek fire at 800 acres Wednesday night. They planned to fly over the blaze today to get a more accurate measurement. Six rural fire departments, two helicopters and the state Department of Natural Resources and Conservation were fighting the fire, according to Karen Tyra, a spokeswoman for Stillwater County.

The rainless storm passed over Reed Point just before 4 p.m., Pratton said, igniting the top of a timbered ridge just southwest of town and south of Interstate 90.

Cleo Purdum, who lives just off the exit at Reed Point, said she heard a rumble, then smelled smoke. At first she didn’t know where it was coming from.

“Then it turned black,” she said.

Neighbors took quick action, moving about 30 head of cattle out of the fire’s path. By 5:30 p.m. the blaze had swept to the east, engulfing ponderosa pines in bursts of flame. By 6 p.m., a spot fire had jumped the road, prompting officials to shut Interstate 90.

Officers had one lane reopened in each direction by 8:30 p.m. Heavy smoke cut visibility to around 100 yards in places, and traffic was moving about 35 mph, according to the Montana Highway Patrol.

Joan and Bill Langford, longtime Reed Point residents both in their 80s, showed up at Pratton’s Reed Point Sinclair. Sue Jensen, Pratton’s sister was relieved. She had seen the fire jump the road in the vicinity of the Langfords’ house and was glad to see them safe and sound.

“We were worried sick about you,” she told the couple.

The Langfords hadn’t shown up sooner because they were watering their property as fast as they could.

“I started (watering) when I saw the fire,” Joan said. “That’s all I had — hoses — but I had two pumps.”

The fire had dropped into their yard, threatened their pasture and was moving toward the hayfield. Luckily, their sheep had been moved down by the river just before the fire started. When the Langfords dashed to the Sinclair to get drinks for the volunteers, Joan said she thought they had the grass fires contained.

“We’re OK — the house is OK, thank God,” she said.

Moments later, the call came across the radios: “structure fire.”

The Langfords’ shop was ablaze, sending plumes of smoke eastward.

Upwind, a barn and outbuildings didn’t appear to be threatened.

But two gas tanks stood only yards from the shop, and the Langfords’ house was situated precariously downwind. In the background, a helicopter disappeared into a thick brown cloud as it continued making water runs from the river to the hills.

They’ve lived here for years and years, Pratton said.

“We’re all family here,” she said. “If it affects one of us, it affects us all.”

As the shop fire seemed to play itself out, Pratton turned her car around to head back to the Reed Point Sinclair. With firemen in town, she knew she’d be busy.

“We’re probably going to have to be here through the night,” she said.

“We’re going to be open for emergency crews,” Jensen added. “Things are going to be happening all night, for sure.”

Stillwater County Commissioner Maureen Davey said it didn’t take much to spark the blaze.

“We haven’t had much lightning,” Davey said. “We had a little bit today and that’s what we got.”

The commissioners on Wednesday afternoon declared an emergency because of the extreme fire danger and the Whistle Creek fire. That will make the county eligible for state disaster money.

“Stillwater County has committed all available resources, taken all possible action to combat and alleviate the situation and local resources may not be adequate to cope with the situation,” the resolution stated. “An emergency is hereby declared
because expenditures may be beyond the financial capability of the county.”

Fire crews from Reed Point, Columbus, Park City, Absarokee and Rapelje fought the fire, Tyre said. Big Timber Fire Department attacked from the west side of the blaze, she said. The helicopters, one from the Gallatin National Forest and one from the Department of State Lands in Helena, had to quit working as the sun set.

I-90 traffic still limited by Reed Point wildfire

By LINDA HALSTEAD-ACHARYA AND BECKY SHAY
Of The Gazette Staff

Smoke from a lightning-caused fire near Reed Point was still thick this morning on Interstate 90 where traffic has been reduced to one lane each way.

The Montana Department of Transportation reported at 8 a.m. that motorists should expect delays from the Reed Point Interchange to four miles east of the tiny Stillwater County town.

Speed has been reduced to 45 mph. DOT warned that the interstate may be closed at any time if fire conditions warrant.

A storm with dry lightning and high winds ignited the fire about 4 p.m. It was estimated at about 800 acres Wednesday night and temporarily closed I-90 Wednesday evening.

Julie Pratton was in her house across from the Reed Point Elementary School when lighting struck shortly before 4 p.m.

I heard it hit – it sounded like a sonic boom, she said.

Almost instantaneously, a tree was in flames.

Officials planned to fly over the blaze today to get a more accurate measurement of its size. Six rural fire departments, two helicopters and the state Department of Natural Resources and Conservation were fighting the fire, according to Karen Tyra, a spokeswoman for Stillwater County.

The rainless storm passed over Reed Point just before 4 p.m., Pratton said, igniting the top of a timbered ridge just southwest of town and south of Interstate 90.

Cleo Purdum, who lives just off the exit at Reed Point, said she heard a rumble, then smelled smoke. At first she didn’t know where it was coming from.

Then it turned black, she said.

Neighbors took quick action, moving about 30 head of cattle out of the fire’s path. By 5:30 p.m. the blaze had swept to the east, engulfing ponderosa pines in bursts of flame. By 6 p.m., a spot fire had jumped the road, prompting officials to shut Interstate 90.

Officers had one lane reopened in each direction by 8:30 p.m. Heavy smoke cut visibility to around 100 yards in places, and traffic was moving about 35 mph, according to the Montana Highway Patrol.

Joan and Bill Langford, longtime Reed Point residents both in their 80s, showed up at Pratton’s Reed Point Sinclair. Sue Jensen, Pratton’s sister was relieved. She had seen the fire jump the road in the vicinity of the Langfords’ house and was glad to see them safe and sound.

We were worried sick about you, she told the couple.

The Langfords hadn’t shown up sooner because they were watering their property as fast as they could.

I started (watering) when I saw the fire, Joan said. That’s all I had – hoses – but I had two pumps.

The fire had dropped into their yard, threatened their pasture and was moving toward the hayfield. Luckily, their sheep had been moved down by the river just before the fire started. When the Langfords dashed to the Sinclair to get drinks for the volunteers, Joan said she thought they had the grass fires contained.

We’re OK – the house is OK, thank God, she said.

Moments later, the call came across the radios: structure fire.

The Langfords’ shop was ablaze, sending plumes of smoke eastward.

Upwind, a barn and outbuildings didn’t appear to be threatened.

But two gas tanks stood only yards from the shop, and the Langfords’ house was situated precariously downwind. In the background, a helicopter disappeared into a thick brown cloud as it continued making water runs from the river to the hills.

They’ve lived here for years and years, Pratton said.

We’re all family here, she said. If it affects one of us, it affects us all.

As the shop fire seemed to play itself out, Pratton turned her car around to head back to the Reed Point Sinclair. With firemen in town, she knew she’d be busy.

We’re probably going to have to be here through the night, she said.

We’re going to be open for emergency crews, Jensen added. Things are going to be happening all night, for sure.

Stillwater County Commissioner Maureen Davey said it didn’t take much to spark the blaze.

We haven’t had much lightning, Davey said. We had a little bit today and that’s what we got.

The commissioners on Wednesday afternoon declared an emergency because of the extreme fire danger and the Whistle Creek fire. That will make the county eligible for state disaster money.

Stillwater County has committed all available resources, taken all possible action to combat and alleviate the situation and local resources may not be adequate to cope with the situation, the resolution stated. An emergency is hereby declared because expenditures may be beyond the financial capability of the county.

Fire crews from Reed Point, Columbus, Park City, Absarokee and Rapelje fought the fire, Tyre said. Big Timber Fire Department attacked from the west side of the blaze, she said. The helicopters, one from the Gallatin National Forest and one from the Department of State Lands in Helena, had to quit working as the sun set.